Amazon offers live channels in Europe

Amazon will be offering live television channels in Europe. Customers who subscribe to the Amazon Prime service in the United Kingdom and Germany can pay an extra monthly fee to watch channels including Discovery, Eurosport and ITV. The initial line-up is rather limited, offering more of a fast food menu than a full à la carte experience.
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BBC iPlayer to require registration

Users of the BBC iPlayer will have to register and sign in to access the service. The BBC says that it will enable people to benefit from personalised features, but admits that it will share user information with TV Licensing for enforcement purposes. It may also use the data to support advertising through third-party services, like Facebook.
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FCC proposes to roll back net neutrality

The Federal Communications Commission has voted in favour of reviewing “net neutrality” rules that require internet service providers to treat all data equally, without blocking, throttling or paid prioritisation of traffic. Once again data discrimination has become a hot topic and it is unlikely to be resolved soon.
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Right to roam across Europe

People will be able to access their online television and movie subscriptions when they roam across borders within the European Union. New rules will only apply to online fee-based services, but providers of free services can optionally make their content portable across the European Union. So what, if anything, does this mean for services in the United Kingdom, which is planning to leave the European Union?
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Warning for British broadcasters

Andrew Neil addressed delegates at the Digital TV Group Summit with a warning about the state of broadcast television in the United Kingdom. He suggested that national broadcasters would struggle to compete with the scale and ambition of global players and there was a risk that much of the business would fall into American ownership.
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United Kingdom pay television prospects

Television services in the United Kingdom saw a modest gain of 83,000 subscribers in the first quarter of 2017. It was the second smallest growth in four years. Yet the majority of homes now pay for television and the number has been steadily rising, driven mainly by online services. So will that proportion continue to grow, or has pay television reached its peak?
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